You Need A Vision

Do you have a clear vision for your life?
You Need A Vision

When there is no vision, the people perish.

King Solomon

 

 

 

So what is your vision?

 

The older we get, the faster time seems to pass. Before we know it, the ambitions, hopes, and dreams of our youth become absorbed and forgotten in the background of life. Forgotten dreams … until one day we reflect back and wonder if we should have done things differently. Questions pop up like: Did I choose the right path? Is it too late to be what I wanted to be?

 

 

 

Is it too late?

 

Creating a vision for your life might seem like a frivolous, fantastical waste of time, but it’s not: creating a compelling vision of the life you want is actually one of the most effective strategies for achieving the life of your dreams. Perhaps the best way to look at the concept of a life vision is a compass to help guide you to take the best actions and make the right choices that help propel you toward your best life.

I want to encourage you that, no matter how old you are or what you’ve been through, follow your destiny and purpose that will satisfy you. What is a life without fulfillment?

So what is your vision?
If you don’t have a vision, it’s time for you to get one!

 

 

 

How to create your vision

 

A vision doesn’t have to be complicated. It can be just about anything.

Don’t expect a clear and well-defined vision overnight – envisioning your life and determining the course you will follow requires time and reflection. You need to cultivate vision and perspective, and you also need to apply logic and planning for the practical application of your vision. Your best vision blossoms from your dreams, hopes, and aspirations. If it is right for you, it will resonate with your values and ideals, and will generate energy and enthusiasm to help strengthen your commitment to exploring the possibilities of your life.

A vision is like any journey – you need to begin with the end in mind. When you’ve created your vision, imagine what it will feel like when you achieve it. What does that end result mean to you and others? Describe the scenario in detail. Allow yourself to dream and imagine, and create a vivid picture, a scenario. If you can’t visualize a picture, focus on how your best life would feel.

 

 

 

The journey

 

Many people have trouble seeing the potential of their dreams; they give up on them because they don’t see how they will ever come true. Yes, there is a difference between a dream, a vision, and goals. To make your vision comes true, you have to do something. Otherwise, they are only dreams.

Vision goes hand in hand with committed action. Visions are always based on giving and creating, not on getting and having. The journey toward our plans, goals and visions is just as important as the destination itself. The journey is what builds our patience, faith, endurance, and self-discipline – our personality.

Sometimes we can’t see the wood for the trees, but you are equipped with gifts and talents to achieve our visions. The dreams that you have are there for a reason: to be realized as a part of fulfilling your life purpose.

As your journey begins, make decisions that are in alignment with your vision. This may not always be easy – in fact, you may become abundantly aware of how things are in contrast to the vision you’ve created.

Choose and improve your strategy, wisely. Vision and strategy are both important. But there is a priority to them. Vision always comes first. Always! If you have a clear vision, you will eventually attract the right strategy. If you don’t have a clear vision, no strategy will save you.

 

 

 

Step by step

 

Goals quantify and define the steps you must take. They are the signposts that let you know you are moving in the right direction. I recommend using a special format for your goals; the SMART-Format for well-formed goals. It helps you ensure that the goal you are setting is Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Relevant, and Time-Bound.

 

 

State the goal in the positive

 

Describe the present situation and compare it with the desired future goal.

  • Where are you now?
  • Where do you want to be?
  • What do you want?
  • State your goals it in the positive and describe what you want to achieve instead what you want to avoid.
  • What are you going toward?

 

 

Use sensory-based evidence to define your goal

 

  • What will you see, hear, feel, etc., when you have it?
  • What steps or stages are involved in reaching this goal?
  • Engage all of your senses in this description process to employ more of your brain and nervous system.
  • Breaking down your goal into manageable steps makes it easier.
  • What are the sizes of the behavioral chunks? Could the size possibly overwhelm you?

 

 

Specify the goal in a compelling way

 

  • Is the goal compelling?
  • Does it pull on you?
  • Make it a compelling future representation that’s dissociated.

 

 

Double check

 

Make sure that your goal works for you in all areas of your life.

 

  • Is the desired goal right for you in all circumstances of your life?
  • Is your goal appropriate in all your personal relationships?
  • What will having your goal give you that you do not now have?
  • What will having your goal cause you to lose?
  • Is your goal achievable?
  • Does it respect your health, relationships and other relevant areas of your life?
  • Pay attention to how your whole self responds to the question in terms of images, sounds, words, and sensations within you.

 

 

Self-initiated and maintained

 

  • Is the goal something that you can initiate yourself and maintain?
  • Test your goal by asking if it is something that you have within your power or ability to do.
  • Is it within your control?
    Your goal must be something that you can initiate and maintain. It must not be something dependent on other people. Make sure that your goal reflects things that you can directly affect.
  • Is it self-initiated and maintained?

 

 

State the context of the goal

 

  • Where, when, how, with whom, etc. will you get this goal?
  • Is your goal appropriately contextualized?
  • Test your goal by applying it to relevant contexts.
  • Readjust your goal until it fits.

 

 

State the resources you need

 

  • What resources will you need in order to reach this goal?
  • Who will you have to become?
  • Who else has achieved this goal?
  • Have you ever had or done this before?
  • What prevents you from moving toward it and attaining it now?

 

 

Evidence procedure

 

  • How will you know that your goal has been realized?
  • What will let you know that you have attained that desired state?